KinderTransport

The kindertransport story

Kindertransport is the name given to the rescue mission that began nine months prior to the outbreak of World War II. The United Kingdom took in nearly 15,000 Jewish and non Jewish children from Nazi Germany, Austria, Czechoslovakia and the Free City of Danzig. The children were placed in British foster homes, hostels, and farms. In gratitude to the people of Great Britain and in commemoration of the 1.6 million children murdered in the Holocaust, five memorial sculptures were erected along the children’s route to safety. Frank Meisler himself was a "kinder" child. Making the series of Kindertransport sculptures along his own personal route to survival, was very important for him. He considered these monuments his most significant and meaningful pieces of art. .

Kindertransport – The Departure. Gdansk-Danzig, Poland (2009)

Erected at the main Railway Station of Gdansk The sculpture depicts the departure of the Jewish children shortly before their families were deported and murdered in the Holocaust.

Trains to Life – Trains to Death. Berlin, Germany (2008)

This bronze sculpture commemorates 1.6 million children murdered in the Holocaust and 10,000 children whose lives were saved by being granted entry into England in 1938. The sculpture is standing at the Friedrichstrasse Railway Station.

The Final Parting. Hamburg, Germany (2015)

This bronze sculpture commemorates 1.6 million children murdered in the Holocaust and 10,000 children whose lives were saved by being granted entry into England in 1938. The sculpture is standing at the Dag Hammarskjöld Platz - Dammtor Bahnhof Hamburg.

Channel Crossing to Life. Rotterdam, Netherlands

The children left Germany in small groups, travelling mostly via the Netherlands and reached England on the Hoek of Holland- Harwich ferries. The sculpture is standing at the Hook of Holland.

Kindertransport – The Arrival. London, Great Britain (2006)

This sculpture commemorates the arrival of the Kindertransports at Liverpool Street Station in central London, from which the children were sent to foster homes and hostels.

BBC movie - "Kindertransport: A Journey to Life" (2012)

This BBC Newsnight movie aired in 2012, and has been shortlisted for the IWM Short Film Festival 2016. 75 years after the British government sanctioned a mission to bring 10,000 Jewish children to the UK, some of those who came to Britain speak about their memories. It contains one of the last interviews with Sir Nicholas Winton who organized the transport of the Jewish children to the UK. Producer: Maria Polachowska.

The Kindertransport Miniatures

Three of the public sculptures are available online in a small version.
Check out our "Jewish figures" collection in the Judaica section.

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